Interviewing THE BRUNERMAN – BRENT EASTERLING

Brent Easterling of L and L Gamefarm – ALABAMA, USA
Born and raised in Alabama. I love this sport and my fowl, second to only the good Lord and my family. I try to do my best by my fowl and I thrive off of negativity. The negativity only makes me want to be better and produce better results in this sport. I refuse to be content in just one bracket and I always try to hold myself to a higher standard. I am true to my word because honesty will take you far.

Mhar Delaben: How did you get started in this sport?
Brent Easterling: My dad, Jim Easterling, got his first fowl in 1963 and he never looked back so I guess you could say that I was born into this sport. While growing up, other people my age would be at the lake or school proms etc. and I chose to be on the farm watering and feeding and going to shows.

I believe there is more jealousy in this sport than any other sport. There is always someone watching and waiting for you to fail, then there are those that go out of their way to make sure you fail.

Mhar Delaben: What Families of fowl do you breed?
Brent Easterling: Bruner RH, Kelso, Butcher and Regular Grays

Mhar Delaben: Where is most of your fowl sold to yearly?
Brent Easterling: Mostly crossed stags are sold to Mexico. My brood fowl is mostly sold to California, Texas, and the Philippines.

Mhar Delaben: How many chicks do you currently hatch each season?
Brent Easterling: I hatched around 2,500 this year and I plan to up that number to 3,000 next year.

Mhar Delaben: What’s your main bloodline?
Brent Easterling: I would have to say that the Bruner RH is my main bloodline. I’ve never personally seen fowl that can match their athleticism and cutting ability. They are the best crossing fowl that I have ever owned.

Mhar Delaben: How did you come up with the L&L Game Farm name?
Brent Easterling: My wife, Kassi, and I named our twin boys Landon and Lincoln and unless I miss my guess, I’m sure they will take over one day hence the name L&L.

“I got my Bruner’s directly from Larry Morris, my dad got his first from Larry Morris in the 70’s and when I need to freshen up, I still go to Larry Morris. I have never had to add anything to my Bruner’s and it looks like I won’t have to for many years to come.”

Larry Morris and Brent.

Mhar Delaben: What current goals do you strive for in this sport?
Brent Easterling: To breed and raise the best, healthiest fowl possible. To make it possible that when people hear or mention RH or Kelso that they attach the name L&L to it.

Mhar Delaben: What’s your opinion on culling?
Brent Easterling: I think Culling is one of my most important parts of raising my fowl. If I wouldn’t own it, I’m not going to sell it. People who don’t cull hard only care about the money and not the fowl or the customer.

Mhar Delaben: What do you look for when selecting game fowl for breeding?
Brent Easterling: Gameness, traits, body conformation, overall health from chick to stag/cock, station, performance. I look at everyday changes (if any) before I put fowl in a brood pen. This is the same with my pullets/ hens. Their parents, brother’s performance, station, body, health, and attitude are all considered.

L&L Gamefarm landscape view

Mhar Delaben: Any tips for beginners?
Brent Easterling: Do your homework, don’t overwhelm yourself with a ton of different breeds. Don’t pay attention to the name of the fowl, pay attention to the results, get yourself 2 or 3 lines and on perfecting them. Don’t be cheap when it comes to selecting and purchasing your fowl. In this sport you get what you pay for. Take pride in your fowl and take care of them if you want them to take care of you. Never settle for anything less than healthy fowl.

Mhar Delaben: Any advice or tips on how to prepare fowl for a show?
Learn your fowl, every bloodline is different. The key to winning is cutting and that comes from the amount of work vs the rest, in my opinion.

“I thrive daily to have one tenth of the knowledge he does about fowl. His past accomplishments are what gives me my drive.”

Bruner Round Head

Mhar Delaben: So, you do this for a living?
Brent Easterling: Yes, when I decided to go from a hobby to a lifestyle I devoted my whole life to it. My shorter days are 10 hours and sometimes the day goes until the next morning. It makes me happy and also makes a way for me to provide for my family. What more could you ask for?

Mhar Delaben: Any health tips you can provide our readers with to help them care for their fowl better?
I think health is the most overlooked part of this sport. Without quality heathy fowl your going in reverse and you will never get ahead. Everyone has heard the expression “an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure.” I live by that. Don’t just walk past your pens or cords, get to know each and every one of your birds. They all need different care.

Brent and his ‘legend’ great friends.

Mhar Delaben: Is there any jealousy in this sport?
Brent Easterling: I believe there is more jealousy in this sport than any other sport. There is always someone watching and waiting for you to fail, then there are those that go out of their way to make sure you fail. I personally don’t let this type of stuff bother me, it strives me to be better and to work harder to build L&L’s reputation.

Mhar Delaben: What is your opinion on being a cocker?
Brent Easterling: I think that being a cocker is one of the greatest honors that there as if you’re a true cocker and not a fly by night peddler. Being a cocker is when everyone else is taking short cuts, your taking the hard way. When everyone else is on vacation, you’re at home with your fowl. On holidays your fowl is always a priority. If there is time after your fowl has been attended to then you can enjoy life’s pleasures. No matter if its 10 or 100 degrees outside your fowl have to have feed and water.
Are there any breeders who have influenced your dreams in this sport?
Not necessarily, but I can appreciate the things that certain people have accomplished with their fowl. I have great respect for the true cockers who have helped pave the way for others.

Mhar Delaben: Who got you started in this sport?
Brent Easterling: My dad. I thrive daily to have one-tenth of the knowledge he does about fowl. His past accomplishments are what gives me my drive.

Purebred Warrior Cover Magazine Issue no. 2

Mhar Delaben: I really love the cover headline “The Bruner man” perfectly fit and catered to you. Can you tell us how you’re going to withstand the trials and success ahead?
Brent Easterling: First, I would like to say thank you. It has been an honor for doing this interview. I appreciate the opportunity to represent L&L and I look forward too many more years of watching it grow. The Bruner’s are some of the most athletic and accurate fowl that I have ever seen. They are smarter than the average RH and a deadly cutter. They are a great base bloodline. You can cross them with anything and make the other line better. I got my Bruner’s directly from Larry Morris, my dad got his first from Larry Morris in the ’70s and when I need to freshen up, I still go to Larry Morris. I have never had to add anything to my Bruner’s and it looks like I won’t have to for many years to come. There will always be trials when it comes to this sport, people who want to see you fail as a breeder and a feeder. The trials are easy to deal with, just be honest to who you are and who you were when you started this sport. Do your best and the trials will work themselves out. Success is a little harder to manage, it takes hard work, motivation, and the willingness to evolve in this sport. Stay humble and work hard and your trials will help you succeed.


Disclaimer
Purebred Warrior reserves the right to accept or refuse materials for publication or advertising. Perspectives expressed by the authors and contributors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Purebred Warrior. No materials may be reposted or reprinted from this website without obtaining prior written consent from the publisher. Facts contained in the articles referred only to circumstances when the sport of cockfighting was still legal in the United States. Articles were written to recognize a past American cultural heritage. No game fowls will be sent to countries where cockfighting is illegal. Please take note that cockfighting is legal in the Philippines. It is your responsibility to assess whether or not cockfighting is permitted in the country where you stay.

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totomagal2007
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marami salamat sa kaalaman pa tongkol sa pagmamanok….

totomagal2007
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marami salamat sa mga kaalaman

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